ORBIS DESCRIPTIO

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Mint example of Ruscelli's map of the world from his La Geografia, the first double hemisphere world map to appear in an Atlas.

One of two modern world maps in Ruscelli's Atlas, based upon Gastaldi's world map of 1548. The map is a copper plate engraving by Sanuto. The map is adapted from the oval projection used in Gastaldi's larger world map and is presented on Roger Bacon's circular projection, also used by Tramezzino's large world map of 1554. This projection was popularized by Ruscelli and later by Rumold Mercator. Another important feature of the map is the apocryphal bulge in South America; one of the most copied cartographic errors of the 16th century. Terra Incognita is distinctly shown as a land bridge linking Asia and North America with its coastline labeled Littus incognitum. There is no southern continent. Italian text on verso.

Good strong impression..Recommended

Mint condition.

References: Shirley #110; Manasek #20.

code : M4012

Cartographer : RUSCELLI Girolamo

Date : 1574 Venice

Size : 18*26 cms

availability : Sold

Price : Sold

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Girolamo Ruscelli (1500s-1566) was an Italian polymath, humanist, editor, and cartographer active in Venice during the early 16th century. Ruscelli is best known for his important revision of Ptolemy's Geographia, which was published post humously in 1574. It is generally assumed that Alexius Pedemontanus was a pseudonym of Girolamo Ruscelli. In a later work, Ruscelli reported that the Secreti contained the experimental results of an ‘Academy of Secrets’ that he and a group of humanists and noblemen founded in Naples in the 1540s. Ruscelli’s academy is the first recorded example of an experimental scientific society. The academy was later imitated by Giambattista Della Porta, who founded an ‘Accademia dei Secreti’ in Naples in the 1560s.